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Innovation Dock is a place with an amazing atmosphere. Every second you spend there you feel like somethi... Show More
Magnus Meisal

The Stavanger area of Norway is like the lovechild of Santorini’s high cliffs and Scotland’s lush hills. At the intersection of three fjords carved into the country’s southwest coast, the region displays some of the rawest beauty found in nature (see Preikestolen or “Pulpit Rock” and Månafossen waterfall). In addition to craggy mountains, Stavanger has a long sandy shoreline rich with vegetation and wildlife that begs for exploration.

The city itself is utterly picturesque and peaceful, a perfect combination of laidback city life and hardy industry. The oil capital of Norway, Stavanger boasts an unemployment rate of only 2.2% thanks to the booming industry, which also employs many of the expats who call the city home. But with intimate cobbled streets, cozy wooden houses with flowerboxes under the windows, and other immaculately-kept 18th century charm, it’s certainly not an impersonal money-driven town. Woodwork (as seen in the quaint wooden buildings of the old district) and shipbuilding are, in fact, traditional trades of Stavanger that predate oil. Under the 2008 European Capital of Culture initiative, the “wooden city” gave a nod to its heritage in a series of timber-only building projects aptly named Norwegian Wood.

There are, of course, many housing options for expats other than the whimsical and expensive cottages of downtown. City apartments are popular for the young and/or single while large suburban houses are popular with families. Living costs are lower than those in Oslo, but not all that significantly, so don’t expect to shell out for smoked mackerel, salmon, or mussels at every meal (though indulging in the North Sea-sourced seafood once daily is highly recommended).

Though quiet during the day, the city center also offers lively restaurants, bars, and clubs and plenty of cafes for a morning coffee to mitigate your hangover. There are also a surprising number of annual festival and events for a city of only 130,000, most notably the MaiJazz festival every May which draws a good crowd of Norwegians and summer tourists.

With an incredible juxtaposition of modernity and outdoor spectacles, a reliable bus service and rail system that connects it to the rest of the country, and the head space for creativity and serious hustle, Stavanger guarantees a free-and-easy lifestyle for the adventurous, cool-weather and nature-loving nomad.

Find the best coworker community for you by clicking on our interactive map and exploring Stavanger’s coworking spaces.

The Stavanger area of Norway is like the lovechild of Santorini’s high cliffs and Scotland’s lush hills. At the intersection of three fjords carved into the country’s southwest coast, the region displays some of the rawest beauty found in nature (see Preikestolen or “Pulpit Rock” and Månafossen waterfall). In addition to craggy mountains, Stavanger has a long sandy shoreline rich with vegetation and wildlife that begs for exploration.

The city itself is utterly picturesque and peaceful, a perfect combination of laidback city life and hardy industry. The oil capital of Norway, Stavanger boasts an unemployment rate of only 2.2% thanks to the booming industry, which also employs many of the expats who call the city home. But with intimate cobbled streets, cozy wooden houses with flowerboxes under the windows, and other immaculately-kept 18th century charm, it’s certainly not an impersonal money-driven town. Woodwork (as seen in the quaint wooden buildings of the old district) and shipbuilding are, in fact, traditional trades of Stavanger that predate oil. Under the 2008 European Capital of Culture initiative, the “wooden city” gave a nod to its heritage in a series of timber-only building projects aptly named Norwegian Wood.

There are, of course, many housing options for expats other than the whimsical and expensive cottages of downtown. City apartments are popular for the young and/or single while large suburban houses are popular with families. Living costs are lower than those in Oslo, but not all that significantly, so don’t expect to shell out for smoked mackerel, salmon, or mussels at every meal (though indulging in the North Sea-sourced seafood once daily is highly recommended).

Though quiet during the day, the city center also offers lively restaurants, bars, and clubs and plenty of cafes for a morning coffee to mitigate your hangover. There are also a surprising number of annual festival and events for a city of only 130,000, most notably the MaiJazz festival every May which draws a good crowd of Norwegians and summer tourists.

With an incredible juxtaposition of modernity and outdoor spectacles, a reliable bus service and rail system that connects it to the rest of the country, and the head space for creativity and serious hustle, Stavanger guarantees a free-and-easy lifestyle for the adventurous, cool-weather and nature-loving nomad.

Find the best coworker community for you by clicking on our interactive map and exploring Stavanger’s coworking spaces.

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